Wednesday, June 6th, 2018

Admission To All Screenings Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)


The NHdocs Videotheque

Philip Marrett room, New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm Street

Screenings at 12:00 and 2:30 PM

Full schedule HERE.

 



Admission To All Screenings Is Free

 



6:30 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Rendered Small (Louis Cherry, Marsha Gordon, 2018) – 15min – Connecticut Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

RENDERED SMALL explores the over 1,200 American folk art buildings on display in Steve Burke and Randy Campbell’s private collection, located in Hillsborough, North Carolina.  These diminutive churches, movie theaters, houses, schools, factories, bowling alleys, and more were made during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries out of materials ranging from meticulously detailed tin and wood, to cigar and Velveeta boxes.  The collectors have added on to their home multiple times in order to accommodate their continuously growing collection and discuss what it is like to live amongst so many treasures and, as a married couple, with each other’s obsessions.

Website: http://marshagordon99.wixsite.com/filmprof/rendered-small

North Pole, NY (Ali Cotterill, 2018) – 69min – Connecticut Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

NORTH POLE, NY is a truly delightful documentary about Santa’s Workshop, one of the very first theme parks in the U.S. Battling against a changing economy, the digital world, and a con-man who tries to steal Christmas, the dreamers in one small town vow to keep the park open and the magic of Christmas alive all year.

Website: www.northpolenyfilm.com

Q&A with director follows screening



7:00 PM – Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Dawnland (Adam Mazo and Ben Pender Cudlip, 2018) – 86min – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

For most of the 20th century, government agents systematically forced Native American children from their homes and placed them with white families. As recently as the 1970s, one in four Native children nationwide were living in non-Native foster care, adoptive homes, or boarding schools. Many childr

Now, for the first time, they are being asked to share their stories.

In Maine, a historic investigation—the first government-sanctioned truth and reconciliation commission (TRC) in the United States—begins a bold journey. For over two years, Native and non-Native commissioners travel across Maine. They gather testimony and bear witness to the dramatic impact of the state’s child welfare practices on families in Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot tribal communities. Collectively, these tribes make up the Wabanaki people.

The feature-length documentary DAWNLAND follows the TRC to contemporary Wabanaki communities to witness intimate, sacred moments of truth-telling and healing. With exclusive access to this groundbreaking process and never-before-seen footage, the film reveals the untold narrative of Indigenous child removal in the United States.

The TRC discovers that state power continues to be used to break up Wabanaki families, threatening the very existence of the Wabanaki people. Can the they right this wrong, and turn around a broken child welfare system? DAWNLAND foregrounds the immense challenges that this groundbreaking body faces as they work toward truth, reconciliation, and the survival of all Indigenous peoples.

Living at the easternmost edge of Turtle Island, the Wabanaki people are the first to see the new day’s light. If harmony and justice begin in the east, as some prophesize, surely the TRC is a sign of this beginning.

Q&A with co-director Ben Pender-Cudlip, moderated by Ned Blackhawk (Western Shoshone), Professor of History and American Studies, Yale University, follows screening



Admission To All Screenings Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)


8:30 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Searchdog (Mary Healey Jamiel, 2016) – 88min – Connecticut Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

SEARCHDOG is the story of Matt Zarrella, a Search Specialist who rehabilitates “unadoptable” shelter dogs and transforms them into Search & Rescue/Recovery Dogs. We come to know Matthew and his dogs and witness extraordinary moments over four and a half years of real-time searches as he trains troopers and their new canine partners to find missing persons.

Website: www.searchdogmovie.com

Q&A with director Mary Healey Jamiel and Matt Zarrella follows screening



9:00 PM – Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Beatrix Farrand, Landscape Architect: Yale University (Karyl Evans, 2018) – 5min – Connecticut Premiere

A short documentary about landscape architect Beatrix Farrand’s pioneering  campus work for Yale University from 1922 – 1945 including her plans for Marsh Botanic Garden, the residential college courtyards, the president’s garden, and the medical school among many others.  Beatrix Farrand (1872-1959) was the only female founding member of the American Society of Landscape Architects.  She also designed gardens for the White House, the New York Botanical Garden, many private estates, as well as a number of college campuses.

Website: BeatrixFarrandDocumentary.com

Feminists: What Were They Thinking? (Johanna Demetrakas, 2018) – 86min – New England Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

 

In 1977, a book of photographs captured an awakening – women shedding the cultural restrictions of their childhoods and embracing their full humanity. FEMINISTS: WHAT WERE THEY THINKING? revisits those photos, those women and those times and takes aim at our culture today that alarmingly shows the need for continued change.

Website: www.feministswhatweretheythinking.com

Q&A with director Johanna Demetrakas, producer Lisa Remington, editor Kate Amend, and director Karyl Evans follows screening