Wednesday, June 5th, 2019

Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)



DAYTIME DOCS at the NHFPL

11:00 AM til 6:00 PM

New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm Street, New Haven

We will be screening seven films at the library today: Blue Breath; Beatrix Farrand, Landscape Architect, Yale University; The New Haven Green: Heart of a City; Monumental, The Bears Ears Story; The Black Mountain; Bungalow Sessions; and one film to be announced.

For times, locations and information on each film, click here.



Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)



EVENING DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM



6:30 PM – Auditorium, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

IRIS (Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services) presents Day One (Lori Miller, 2019) – 81min – New England premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

DAY ONE follows a group of teens from war zones in the Middle East and Africa, as they are resettled in St. Louis, MO and enrolled at a unique public school for refugees-only. Traumatized upon their arrival — having survived war and years in refugee camps — the kids are guided through an incredible program of healing, PTSD intervention, education and adjustment by the school’s passionate and talented educators, some of whom have chosen to live with their families in the inner-city in order to be closer to their students.

Our featured teens come from Somalia, Afghanistan, the Congo, Iraq, and Syria. Some have lost one or both parents, have been unable to attend school for years on end, and have suffered war traumas.  These students and their families are faced with economic, language, psychological and cultural challenges, sometimes dangerous living conditions, and the U.S.’s turbulent anti-immigrant political climate.

Filmed over the course of a year, we watch the kids progress through their layers of grief and loss as they attend school, forge new friendships, and prepare to be mainstreamed into “regular” public high-school with the support and mentorship of their unbelievably compassionate teachers and advocates. Their triumphs and tribulations all unfold with St. Louis as the backdrop: a rust-belt city in the heart of America that has taken the bold step of welcoming immigrants as a solution for their growing socio-economic problems. 

There will be a panel discussion with director Lori Miller and members of IRIS following the screening.



7:30 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

A Woman’s Work: The NFL’s Cheerleader Problem (Yu Gu, 2019) – 80min – New England premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

A Woman’s Work: The NFL’s Cheerleader Problem shines a spotlight on the NFL and its practices around wage theft and illegal employment of cheerleaders. Director Yu Gu follows several former cheerleaders, sharing both their legal and personal struggles as they fight for minimum wage and end 50 years of inequality inflicted by the NFL. 

The film takes us on a journey focusing on an historic class-action lawsuit that cheerleaders were finally able to bring against the NFL. The subjects of the film inspire each other to take on this seemingly insurmountable battle, and share a story that is more timely than ever. Their fight for wage and gender equality epitomizes many of the challenges faced by working women in all sectors today. – Tribeca Film Festival website



Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)



9:00 PM – Auditorium, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

IRIS (Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services) presents While We Can: the Road to Rescue (Leona Krahn, 2018) – 52min – New England premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

This film tells the story of two incredible individuals, both seniors from Winnipeg, Manitoba, who are dedicating their lives to rescuing refugees through Hospitality House Refugee Ministry. Shot over six months, the film captures their day to day work, challenges and compassion for the men, women and children they help save from myriad countries, mostly African. Tom Denton has played a role in the rescue of 40,000 refugees to Canada and is a world expert on the topic of private sponsorship. Canada is the only country in the world that allows private sponsorship of refugees; this film gives rare insight into how it all works.



9:00 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Shorts Block #4

We will be screening the following seven short documentary films: Carlotta’s Face; My Father, My Farm; Drift; Crime, The Animated Series: Marcus McGhee; Lost Weekend; Molly from Scratch; and Flying Fur

For detailed descriptions click here.

Q&A with a number of the films’ directors and/or subjects follows screening.



9:00 PM – The State House, 310 State Street, New Haven

Circus of Books (Rachel Mason, 2019) – 91min – Connecticut premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

NOTE: no one under the age of 21 will be allowed to this screening.

In 1976, Karen and Barry Mason had fallen on hard times and were looking for a way to support their young family when they answered an ad in the Los Angeles Times. Larry Flynt was seeking distributors for Hustler Magazine. What was expected to be a brief sideline led to their becoming fully immersed in the LGBT community as they took over a local store, Circus of Books. A decade later, they had become the biggest distributors of gay porn in the US. The film focuses on the double life they led, trying to maintain the balance of being parents at a time when LGBT culture was not yet accepted. Their many challenges included facing jail time for a federal obscenity prosecution and enabling their store to be a place of refuge at the height of the AIDS crisis. Circus of Books offers a rare glimpse into an untold chapter of queer history, and it is told through the lense of the owners’ own daughter, Rachel Mason, an artist, filmmaker and musician.

Q&A with the film’s subjects, Barry & Karen Mason, moderated by filmmaker Gorman Bechard, follows screening