Shorts Block #3

Admission To All Screenings Is Free



9:00 PM – Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven 

SHORTS BLOCK #3

Charcoal (Francesca Andre, 2018) – 5min – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film – presented in partnership with the Nasty Women Film Festival

Charcoal captures the parallel stories of two black women and their lifelong journey to overcome internalized colorism, find self-acceptance and ultimately redemption. 

Where We’ve Been (Ashley Brandon, 2016) – 4min – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

A woman dedicates her life to remembering the past, but now as dementia fogs her memory her life’s work bares the risk of being forgotten

Diego (Kristin Zimney, Annie Franks, Aloha Backenstose, and Angela Rios, 2018) – 17min – Connecticut Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

An undocumented immigrant’s fight to keep the American Dream alive after President Trump’s decision to rescind the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program.

The Secret Life of Muslims (Joshua Seftel, 2018) – 3min – Connecticut Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

From the iconic symbol of the US Marine Corps to the face of Lady Liberty herself, Muslim culture and religion has a strong historic influence on America today. In this short animated documentary created by the team behind the viral series “The Secret Life of Muslims,” comedian Negin Farsad and Barnard College professor Hussein Rashid reveal just how much American Culture owes to the Muslim world, and just how long Muslims have called this country home.

Website: www.secretlifeofmuslims.com

Election Day 2016 (Linda Moroney, 2018) – 15min – New England Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

After a long and contentious presidential campaign, more than 10,000 people spontaneously visited Susan B. Anthony’s grave in Rochester, New York to pay tribute to America’s most famous suffragist and place their “I Voted Today” stickers upon her headstone as an expression of their pride and gratitude. Although the gravesite was still a gathering place the next day, the atmosphere was far different.

 

Q&A with filmmakers follows screening



Admission To All Screenings Is Free