Shorts Block #1

Admission To All Screenings Is Free



1:30 PM – New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm Street, New Haven

SHORTS BLOCK #1

All For This (Eric Jenkins-Sahlin, 2017) – 2:34min – New England Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

Melissa Caskey, the self-proclaimed queen of part time jobs, works her butt off to make ends meet while pursuing her passion for music.  She likes folk, but loves the blues. Raised in the tobacco fields of Kentucky, recently divorced, her father’s caretaker, and a proud young grandmother, Melissa found her voice by channeling early blues women from the 1920s and 1930s.  On stage, the microphone is all hers, and she’s doesn’t shy away from letting it all out by singing “hateful” songs like, “God May Forgive You (But I Won’t).”

Arrested (Again) (Dan Goldes, 2017) – 4:33min – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

Activist and Rhode Island native Karen Topakian has been arrested dozens of times for using nonviolent civil disobedience to protest nuclear proliferation, human rights abuses, environmental issues, and war. What drives her to repeatedly put her body on the line? In turn lighthearted and moving, Karen’s story speaks to the need for Americans, now more than ever, to exercise this important First Amendment right.

Dripping Identity (Ina Chen, 2018) – 5:36min – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film – presented in partnership with the Nasty Women Film Festival

who am I? where do I come from? who’s my family? do I know them anymore? how far am I away from home? what is my identity? from a self point of view: always “on my way” to somewhere else, to study, to work, to travel, to have a life. is it possible to pursue one’s roots and where is the fundamental base (family)?

Recovering Lives (Jeff Bemiss, 2018) – 26min – World Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

RECOVERING LIVES shares three powerful recovery stories related to autism, childhood trauma/mental illness and addiction. 

The Kampala Boxing Club (Sean Kernan, 2018) – 42min – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

One hot afternoon Sean Kernan wandered into the Kampala Boxing Club in Uganda — for no good reason. He knew nothing about boxing and didn’t really care. And he hung out there for the next seven years, returning again and again to film a deep dive into the far-off world of big-city boxers in Africa, with all of its passion, humanity, and ferocious focus. 

Q&A with filmmakers moderated by Tom Breen of the New Haven Independent follows screening



Admission To All Screenings Is Free