Saturday, June 2nd, 2018

Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)


11:00 AM – Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven – ROOM 208

Workshop on the Art of the Documentary Interview

Details to be announced



1:30 PM – New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm Street, New Haven

SHORTS BLOCK #1

The following  5 short films will be screened: All For This, Arrested (Again), Dripping Identity, Recovering Lives, The Kampala Boxing Club.  More information HERE.



3:30 PM – New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm Street, New Haven

SHORTS BLOCK #2

The following  5 short films will be screened: Connection in Crisis – The Story of Spartacus and the K9 First Responders, Where We’ve Been, Segmented Sleep, Broken Souls, The Unconditional.  More information HERE.



Admission To All Screenings Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)


7:00 PM – Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

25 Prospect Street (Kaveh Taherian, 2018) – 87min – World Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

 

In a dramatic attempt to get closer with her sister, an eccentric schoolteacher creates a new kind of movie theater business in Ridgefield, CT, where people with disabilities are given the freedom to fail and discover where they can shine in the workforce. The sisters come to realize that navigating family is not as easy as building a revolutionary business model, but learn that
 success for both lies in celebrating the individual.

Q&A with director follows screening



7:30 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Working in Protest (Michael Galinsky and Suki Hawley, 2018) – 79min – New England Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

Weaving together the themes of race, power, and the media from over 30 years of footage, WORKING IN PROTEST offers an observational narrative about the history of protest and activism in the United States.

Website: www.rumur.com

Q&A with co-director Michael Galinsky follows screening



Admission To All Screenings Is Free

 



9:00 PM – Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

One Vote (Christine Woodhouse, 2018) – 78min – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

Filmed in five locations on a single day, Connecticut director Christine Woodhouse’s One Vote captures the compelling stories of diverse American voters on Election Day 2016.

The characters of One Vote include the charismatic owner of the last tavern polling place in the US, an Alaskan family that travels miles of snow-covered roads by dogsled to reach their polling place, an iconic American investor who devotes his Election Day to transporting voters in Omaha needing a ride to vote, a gospel-singing physician who heals and empowers disenfranchised citizens in rural South Carolina, and a former felon, casting an emotional vote in Kentucky for the first time since his right to vote was restored. Their stories connect us with the struggles of generations past, as well as voters’ dreams for the future. At times funny, surprising and heart-wrenching, the film eschews partisan politics in favor of an honest portrayal of voters’ Election Day experiences.

At a moment of unprecedented cynicism about the political process, One Vote bears hopeful witness to the humanity and rich diversity of American voters, and to the unsung stories that comprise our exercise of democracy.

Website: www.onevote.us

Q&A with director follows screening



9:30 PM –Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Playing Soldier (Edwin Gendron, 2018) – 72min – Connecticut Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

New Haven director Edwin Gendron’s PLAYING SOLDIER examines What happens when six war reenactors with different perspectives on American history don WWII era uniforms and attempt to relive someone else’s war?  By turning a lens on this seemingly innocuous hobby, this film mirrors today’s polarization of American life.  Edward is the quintessential Southern history addict.  Stacy & Marisha are photographers who run afoul of a Nazi reenacting unit.  Brad & Kami are a married couple who portray a German soldier and nurse.When they encounter Stacy and Marisha, conflicts arise.  Charles reenacts to alleviate his PTSD, a result of his years serving as a Washington, D.C. police officer.

Q&A with director follows screening