Monday, June 3rd, 2019

Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)



DAYTIME DOCS at the NHFPL

11:00 AM til 6:00 PM

New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm Street, New Haven

We will be screening three feature films at the library today: The Last Pig; Sickies Making Films, Riplist; , as well as a replay of six short films from this year.

For times, locations and information on each film, click here.



Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)



EVENING DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM

6:30 PM – Auditorium, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Billion Dollar Bully (Kaylie Milliken, 2019) – 90min – East Coast premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

Today consumers Yelp everything from restaurants to dentists; plumbers to surgeons. The small business community sees Yelp’s sales tactic as extortion. Does Yelp genuinely have an interest in helping people support the best local businesses, or are they a pay-to-play advertising platform?

Q&A with director Kaylie Milliken follows screening, moderated by filmmaker Gorman Bechard



7:30 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

The Good, The Bad, The Hungry (Nicole Lucas Haimes, 2019) – 77min – Connecticut Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

Sports is often thought of as a dog-eat-dog world. But as this funny, touching, and evocative documentary makes abundantly clear, competitive eating is really dog-after-dog. And the two biggest dogs in the heyday of the sport were Takeru Kobayashi, a slim zen master from Japan, and Joey Chestnut, a barrel-chested everyman from northern California. Directed by Nicole Lucas Haimes, THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE HUNGRY traces the lives of these unlikely superstars, whose careers were bookmarked by the July 4 Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest.

The annual contest would be nothing without the carnival barker in the straw boater hat, George Shea, who also serves as the puppet-master for this tragicomedy. A latter-day P.T. Barnum, Shea turned major-league eating into a magnet for TV ratings and advertising dollars. But heal so fostered a jingoistic atmosphere that literally kept the sensitive Kobayashi away from the Nathan’s stage, which was a shame for many reasons. As extended interviews with Kobayashi and Chestnut reveal, they had similar upbringings, each featuring a loving family and plenty of food. The undeniable core of their rivalry is that, as long as they were devouring hot dogs and pizza and cow brains, the public ate them up.



Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)



8:30 PM – Auditorium, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Women’s Gender & Sexuality Studies at Yale presents

Breaking Their Silence: Women on the Frontline of the Poaching War (Kerry David, 2019) – 110min – Connecticut premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

The sordid world of wildlife trafficking and poaching is orchestrated by ruthless crime syndicates.  An unlikely group of heroes are rising up to do all they can to prevent and reverse these terrible offenses against the planet. Filmmaker, Kerry David and her dedicated crew, pursue a passion that takes them around the globe to meet the courageous women who are living on the frontline of this silent war; risking all to prevent Africa’s most vulnerable animals from becoming extinct. 

Breaking Their Silence will shine a bright and inspiring light on their intelligence, empathy, strength and stamina to invoke deeply passionate responses from viewers as they watch these women face and conquer insurmountable odds. A hopeful film created to inspire and motivate moviegoers, Breaking Their Silence will challenge everyone to become part of the solution, and arm them with the means to do so. 

Q&A with director Kerry David follows screening, moderated by NHdocs’ Katherine Germano.



9:30 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

You Don’t Nomi (Jeffrey McHale, 2019) – 91min – Connecticut premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

NOTE: no one under the age of 18 will be allowed to this screening.

When it was released in 1995, Paul Verhoeven’s Showgirls was reviled. The first NC-17 release to receive a wide theatrical release, the public and critics of the era—with a loud, clear, collective voice—rejected the film. It was nominated for a record 13 Razzie Awards, and won a then-record seven. Roger Ebert, in one of the more generous reviews the film received, summed his opinion up by noting that, “the film is not, in short, quite unredeemably bad.” But Showgirls’ reputation has been resuscitated in the intervening 24 years, and conceding one’s admiration for Nomi Malone’s sordid tale is no longer the admission of questionable taste it once signified. YOU DON’T NOMI brilliantly draws on archival footage of Showgirls’ production, revealing interviews with the major players, and surprisingly thoughtful conversations with the cinephiles who are leading the charge in the film’s redemptive journey from a notorious flop to cult classic. Is it a masterpiece? Or is it a piece of shit? McHale’s addictive documentary argues for a third designation: the masterpiece of shit.

Q&A with director Jeffrey McHale follows screening, moderated by Fran Fried.