Friday, May 31, 2019

Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)


DAYTIME DOCS at the NHFPL

11:00 AM til 6:00 PM

New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm Street, New Haven

We will be screening five feature films at the library today: Deceptive Diplomacy; VHS Massacre; A Diplomat of Consequence; Major “Doc” Brown; and Black Beach / White Beach

For times, locations and information on each film, click here.



Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)



EVENING DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM

6:45 PM – Auditorium, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Robert Andy Coombs: Just The Tip (Robert Andy Coombs, 2019) – 12min – World premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Short Film

A documentary short focused on intimacy, art, and connection.


And…Seen (Liz Ortiz, 2018) – 78min – Connecticut premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

What if a casting director who has championed inclusion in casting for decades got together with a typecast actress to make a documentary? And… Seen challenges mainstream assumptions of disability through the perspectiveof actress/wheelchair dancer, Jamie Petrone. The documentary is a raw, intimate exploration of Jamie’s life as she defies stereotypes, questions authority, and pursues her dreams, one of which is to be seen as just another human being. The narrative follows Jamie’s encounters with her family, friends, doctors, and industry colleagues through interviews and filmed interaction. Despite the resistance held by the entertainment industry, Jamie works as an actress and we witness her auditions, performances, and struggles to walk again.

Q&A with And…Seendirector Liz Ortiz, subject Jamie Petrone, and editor/co-producer Craig Williams, as well as Just the Tip director Robert Andy Coombs follows screening.



7:30 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Hurdle (Michael Rowley, 2019) – 87min – New England Premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

As the Israeli military occupation of the Palestinian territories approached its 50th year, Hurdle reveals an important and intimate story emerging from the hearts and actions of Palestinian youth. The new generation responds to a world of walls, checkpoints and arrests in 
an unexpected and inspiring way. Hurdle’s protagonists, Sami and Mohammad, begin teaching the creative practices of parkour and photography, respectively, to the youth of their communities as a means to overcome the personal and political obstacles that often feel inescapable. Though these young men are separated by a wall, they are united in leading the next generation toward freedom and self-determination through non-violent, creative practices. 

Parkour is the sport of moving rapidly through an urban environment while negotiating obstacles by running, jumping, and climbing. Sami is a 23-year-old Palestinian and the coach of the Jerusalem Parkour Team. He is a rock to his peers, takes his role as a mentor seriously and remains steadfastly devoted to his sport and community. Sami is seen teaching his followers at the base of the Israeli Separation Wall, on the rooftops of Jerusalem and in a small practice gym tucked away in the Old City. The youth, feeling immense pressure from the effects of living under military occupation, explode with a dynamic show of acrobatics – taking back their personal freedom of movement. 

Living on the other side of the wall in the Palestinian West Bank is Mohammad. A lifetime resident of Aida refugee camp, he too turns to creativity in order to escape the walls surrounding him as he passes down his creative practice to the youth of the refugee camp. By developing their skills in photography and storytelling, they are able to document daily life in the camp and broadcast their stories beyond the walls that keep them static. With shocking visuals of military incursions into the camp, the cameras in the hands of youth become tools of response to the violence and loss of innocence they must face. 

Ultimately, Hurdle is an inspiring, enlightening and visceral film emerging from a first-time filmmaker. The story provides an opportunity for a diverse audience to connect on a human level with a community that is underrepresented in the mainstream narrative. Through a quietly observant, cinema verite approach, the audience gets an intimate look at the depth and humanity of the young Palestinian men on screen. In a time when the global conversation is focused on wall-building and dehumanizing “the other,” Hurdle not only documents the evolution of an age-old conflict, but stands as a global harbinger.



Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)


9:00 PM – Auditorium, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Dr. Trash (Ethiraj Gabriel Dattatreyan, 2018) – 25min – New Haven premiere

Dr. Trash knows his treasure from the detritus that surrounds it.  Some of the treasure he seeks lines his pockets, materialized in the thousands of dollars worth of text books, technology, and clothes, that he salvages every year when students move out of a large university on the east coast of the United States.  However, other treasures that he inadvertently finds in the dumpsters and rubbish bins he meticulously mines allow him to speculate on lives of others and to articulate who he is and wishes to be.   

Salvage (Amy C. Elliott, 2019) – 57min – New Haven premiere – in competition for the Audience Award for Best Feature Film

In Yellowknife, the remote capitol of the Northwest Territories of Canada, the town dump is the city’s most popular and notorious manmade attraction, mined by a colorful community of thrifty locals. But the new city administration is determined to see it tamed, and the battle for Yellowknife’s identity is on.

Q&A with Salvage producer Elizabeth Donius and Dr. Trash director Gabriel Dattatreyan follows screening.



9:30 PM – Screening Room 208, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven

Shorts Block #1

We will be screening the following five short documentary films: The Other Border; Saving Mothers and Babies; Colors of Resistance; Crime, The Animated Series: Joe Bascetta; and The Guy: The Brian Donahue Story. 

For detailed descriptions click here.

Q&A with a number of the films’ directors and/or subjects follows screening, moderated by filmmaker Lindsay Thompson