DAYTIME DOCS at the NHFPL – May 31st

Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)



DAYTIME DOCS at the NHFPL

Friday, May 31st, 2019

11:00 AM – New Haven Free Public Library, Community Program Room, 133 Elm Street, New Haven (entrance on corner of Temple Street)

Deceptive Diplomacy (Axel Gordh Humlesjö & Ali Fegan, 2018) – 12min – Connecticut premiere

DECEPTIVE DIPLOMACY is a 2018 investigating documentary that exposed the cover-up within the UN to hide crucial evidence about the murder of the UN experts Zaida Catalán and Michael Sharp in the Democratic Republic of Congo. But it is also a gripping story about two people that wanted to change the world in one of the most dangerous places on earth.  The story became global news shaking the entire United Nations to its core. After the investigation a high ranking officer of the Congolese military was arrested for planning the murder.  In 2019 “Deceptive Diplomacy” won the IRE awards in the US, one of the finest prizes for investigative journalism in the world.



12:00 PM – Videotheque, New Haven Free Public Library, Philip Marrett room, 133 Elm Street, New Haven (use main entrance, take a left at the large information desk)

VHS Massacre (Kenneth Powell &Thomas Edward Seymour, 2016) – 72min – REPLAY of a favorite from NHdocs2016

This award winning, lively documentary explores the rise and fall of physical media and its effect on Independent and cult films. Ranging from the origin of home movies through the video store era, it’s sure to entertain. With icons like Joe Bob Briggs (MonsterVision), Lloyd Kaufman (Toxic Avenger), Greg Sestero (The Room), Debbie Rochon (Return to Nuke ‘Em High), Deborah Reed (Troll 2), Mark Frazer (Samurai Cop), James Nguyen (Birdemic) and many others.



1:30 PM – New Haven Free Public Library, Community Program Room, 133 Elm Street, New Haven (entrance on corner of Temple Street)

A Diplomat of Consequence (Christopher Teal, 2019) – 47min – New England premiere

Ebenezer Bassett had been an abolitionist, educator, and activist during the U.S. Civil War. When the United States emerged from that war, friends such as Frederick Douglass pushed President Grant to appoint black Americans like Bassett to senior government positions. Bassett became the first American to integrate the diplomatic corps, leaving a lasting impact on U.S. foreign policy.  Bassett was a role model not simply for his symbolic importance, however. He was a civil rights leader and among the earliest advocates to promote human rights in foreign policy. His courage in the face of threats during his tenure place him among the greats of diplomatic and American history. Along with public archives on Bassett’s life, newly found information from family members and never before seen material from his four decade relationship with Frederick Douglass are explored in the documentary.

This is not just an historical documentary, however. Bassett’s legacy demonstrates to broader audiences what diplomats have accomplished and what they do in today’s complicated environment. Bringing in contemporary voices of minority diplomats is a crucial component of why diversity in foreign affairs still is imperative for successful engagement today. A Diplomat of Consequence’s release in 2019 coincides with the 150th anniversary of Bassett’s historic diplomatic appointment to Haiti and the Dominican Republic.



2:30 PM – Videotheque, New Haven Free Public Library, Philip Marrett room, 133 Elm Street, New Haven (use main entrance, take a left at the large information desk)

Major “Doc” Brown (JC Barone, 2017) – 40min

This is a story of fate, suffering, and survival. Around stories of war, we always hear about major battles, leaders, and their historical context. Less often do we hear stories of the individual men and women who were in the midst of battles they did not choose, yet they were willing to serve. This puts a name on one of those who survived the Bataan Death March in the Philippines during World War II. Major Albert “Doc” Brown was a middle-aged dentist and U.S. Army reservist who went to war on a coin toss and his life was changed forever.

Q&A with director JC Barone follows screening.



4:00 PM – New Haven Free Public Library, Community Program Room, 133 Elm Street, New Haven (entrance on corner of Temple Street)

Black Beach / White Beach (Ricky Kelly, 2018) – 90min – Connecticut premiere 

A look at how the community of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina views two national motorcycle festivals that happen a week apart in their town.  One festival is primarily white, the other predominately black. 

Q&A with editor David Iverson follows screening.



Admission To All Screenings & Workshops Is Free

(But if you want guaranteed seating and a chance to party with the filmmakers, pick up a Fast Pass or Fast Pass Deluxe HERE.)