Fall Screening Series

FALL SCREENING SERIES

Saturday, September 8th – 8pm to 9pm

The Village: Life in New Haven’s Little Italy

directed by Steve Hamm, 2018 – 60min

Wooster Square Park, New Haven

admission free – seating begins at 7pm

THE VILLAGE: LIFE IN NEW HAVEN’S LITTLE ITALY, tells the story of the Wooster Square neighborhood, which for many years was a tight-knit Italian-American enclave. Using oral history interviews, photos from family albums, and historic films and photographs, the film explores the power of ethnic identity and reaffirms the importance of immigration to American society. Today, few descendants of the immigrants still live in Wooster Square, but vestiges of their community remain–in the church, the ethnic societies and their festas, and the pizza joints and pastry shops. Most vividly, the village lives on in the fond memories of the people who grew up there.

PLEASE NOTE: there will be a Q&A with the film’s director following the screening



Tuesday, September 25th – 7pm to 9pm

Family Meal

directed by Jim O’Connor, 2018– 51min

Best Video, 1842 Whitney Ave, Hamden

suggested donation $5

Three New Haven restaurant families put it all on the table to find harmony in one of the most cut throat industries of all time. The long hours and late nights lend a delicate balance between family and business…all in efforts to find time for a Family Meal.  FAMILY MEAL celebrates the families and flavors from Caseus, Zuppardi’s Apizza, Ricky D’s Rib Shack, Ordinary, & Black Hog Brewing Company.

PLEASE NOTE: there will be a Q&A with the film’s director following the screening



Wednesday, October 3rd – 7pm to 9pm

Gut Renovation and I Cannot Tell You How I Feel

directed by Su Friedrich – 81min/41min

Linsly-Chittenden Hall, Room 101, 63 High St, New Haven

admission free

Gut Renovation: Filmmaker Su Friedrich charts the destruction of Williamsburg, a neighborhood in Brooklyn, so developers can build luxury condos.

I Can Not Tell You How I Feel: Su Friedrich continues her ongoing quest to film the battleground of family life. Her mother plays the lead, kicking and protesting against being taken to an “independent living” facility. Friedrich and her two siblings fill out the supporting roles-cajoling, comforting, and freaking out.

PLEASE NOTE: there will be a Q&A with the film’s director following the screening



Friday, October 5th – 7pm to 9pm

Pizza, A Love Story

Special Work-In-Progress Screening

directed by Gorman Bechard, 2018 – 80min

New England Brewing Company, 175 Amity Rd, Woodbridge

Admission includes screening, two beverages, pizza from Pepe’s, Sally’s & Modern, and Q&A with director.  

For tickets: www.NewEnglandBrewing.com

Over ten years in the making, Pizza, A Love Story, from director Gorman Bechard, and producers Dean Falcone and Colin Caplan, tells the story of how one little town in one of the smallest states just happens to have three of the greatest pizza places in the world…all within a few blocks of each other.

We’re 90 miles from New York City and yet what makes New Yorkers drive the two-plus hours to New Haven just for pizza?  What made Frank Sinatra send his driver from Hoboken, New Jersey, to New Haven just to pick up pizzas?  What makes rock stars visiting the tri-state (NY, NJ, CT) area include in their riders that New Haven pizza must be served in the green room?  What made director Steven Spielberg send a private jet to the local New Haven airport to pick up 50 pies for his son’s wedding?  What is in the proverbial water?  Why is this pizza so good, so different?  What makes people wait in line for hours for New Haven pizza?

Pizza, A Love Story will explain it all.  You’ll learn about the history, the families, the love, and craft that goes into each and every pie.  And you’ll discover a whole new appreciation for pizza as true culinary art.

PLEASE NOTE: this is the second work-in-progress screening of the film.  It will not be 100% complete, but you will be able to talk about it after the screening, critique and make suggestions, helping us turn this into the film monument Pepe’s, Sally’s, and Modern deserve.   

PLEASE NOTE: there will be a Q&A with the film’s director following the screening



Tuesday, October 23rd – 7pm to 9pm

Survivors

directed by Arthur Pratt, 2018 – 90min

Linsly-Chittenden Hall, Room 101, 63 High St, New Haven

admission free

Through the eyes of Sierra Leonean f ilmmakers, Survivors presents a heart‐connected portrait of their country during the Ebola outbreak, exposing the complexity of the epidemic and the socio‐political turmoil that lies in its wake. Survivors chronicles the remarkable stories of Sierra Leonean heroes and community members during what is now regarded as the most acute public health crisis of the modern era.

PLEASE NOTE: there will be a Q&A with the film’s director following the screening



Tuesday, October 30th – 7pm to 9pm

One Vote

directed by Christine Woodhouse, 2018 – 78min

Linsly-Chittenden Hall, Room 101, 63 High St, New Haven

admission free

Filmed in five locations on a single day, Connecticut director Christine Woodhouse’s One Votecaptures the compelling stories of diverse American voters on Election Day 2016.

The characters of One Vote include the charismatic owner of the last tavern polling place in the US, an Alaskan family that travels miles of snow-covered roads by dogsled to reach their polling place, an iconic American investor who devotes his Election Day to transporting voters in Omaha needing a ride to vote, a gospel-singing physician who heals and empowers disenfranchised citizens in rural South Carolina, and a former felon, casting an emotional vote in Kentucky for the first time since his right to vote was restored. Their stories connect us with the struggles of generations past, as well as voters’ dreams for the future. At times funny, surprising and heart-wrenching, the film eschews partisan politics in favor of an honest portrayal of voters’ Election Day experiences.

At a moment of unprecedented cynicism about the political process, One Vote bears hopeful witness to the humanity and rich diversity of American voters, and to the unsung stories that comprise our exercise of democracy.

PLEASE NOTE: there will be a Q&A with the film’s director following the screening



Monday, November 12th – 7pm to 9pm

Playing Soldier

Directed by Edwin Gendron, 2018 – 72min

Best Video, 1842 Whitney Ave, Hamden

suggested donation $5

New Haven director Edwin Gendron’s PLAYING SOLDIER examines What happens when six war reenactors with different perspectives on American history don WWII era uniforms and attempt to relive someone else’s war?  By turning a lens on this seemingly innocuous hobby, this film mirrors today’s polarization of American life.  Edward is the quintessential Southern history addict.  Stacy & Marisha are photographers who run afoul of a Nazi reenacting unit.  Brad & Kami are a married couple who portray a German soldier and nurse.When they encounter Stacy and Marisha, conflicts arise.  Charles reenacts to alleviate his PTSD, a result of his years serving as a Washington, D.C. police officer.

PLEASE NOTE: there will be a Q&A with the film’s director following the screening



PLEASE NOTE: there will be a Q&A with the film’s director following each screening

Produced in cooperation with the Yale FIlm & Media Studies Program and the Poynter Fellowship in Journalism

Thank you to our sponsoring partners: New England Brewing Company, The Best Video Film & Cultural Center, and the Nutmeg Institute